Escape by Inking and Secreting: Marine Molluscs Avoid Predators Through a Rich Array of Chemicals and Mechanisms

@article{Derby2007EscapeBI,
  title={Escape by Inking and Secreting: Marine Molluscs Avoid Predators Through a Rich Array of Chemicals and Mechanisms},
  author={C. Derby},
  journal={The Biological Bulletin},
  year={2007},
  volume={213},
  pages={274 - 289}
}
  • C. Derby
  • Published 2007
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Biological Bulletin
Inking by marine molluscs such as sea hares, cuttlefish, squid, and octopuses is a striking behavior that is ideal for neuroecological explorations. While inking is generally thought to be used in active defense against predators, experimental evidence for this view is either scant or lacks mechanistic explanations. Does ink act through the visual or chemical modality? If inking is a chemical defense, how does it function and how does it affect the chemosensory systems of predators? Does it… Expand
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