Escalation of a coevolutionary arms race through host rejection of brood parasitic young

@article{Langmore2003EscalationOA,
  title={Escalation of a coevolutionary arms race through host rejection of brood parasitic young},
  author={Naomi E. Langmore and Sarah Hunt and Rebecca M. Kilner},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2003},
  volume={422},
  pages={157-160}
}
Cuckoo nestlings that evict all other young from the nest soon after hatching impose a high reproductive cost on their hosts. In defence, hosts have coevolved strategies to prevent brood parasitism. Puzzlingly, they do not extend beyond the egg stage. Thus, hosts adept at recognizing foreign eggs remain vulnerable to exploitation by cuckoo nestlings. Here we show that the breach of host egg defences by cuckoos creates a new stage in the coevolutionary cycle. We found that defences used during… 
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