Equine infectious anaemia

@article{Powell1976EquineIA,
  title={Equine infectious anaemia},
  author={David G. Powell},
  journal={Veterinary Record},
  year={1976},
  volume={99},
  pages={7 - 9}
}
  • D. Powell
  • Published 3 July 1976
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Veterinary Record
Equine infectious anaemia (EIA) is a persistent viral infection of equids. The causative agent, EIA virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus in the family Retroviridae, subfamily Orthoretrovirinae. Other members of the genus Lentivirus include: bovine immunodeficiency virus; caprine arthritis encephalitis virus; feline immunodeficiency virus; human immunodeficiency virus 1; human immunodeficiency virus 2; and maedi/visna virus. EIA can be diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs, pathological lesions… 
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References

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Equine infectious anemia: transmission from infected mares to foals.
Inapparent carriers of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) virus
  • Proceedings of the IVth International Conference on Equine Infectious Diseases
  • 1976
Inapparent carriers of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) virus
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  • 1976
Equine infectious anaemia
The technique and application of the immunodiffusion test for equine infectious anaemia
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