Epistemic duties and blameworthiness for belief

@inproceedings{Gadsden2014EpistemicDA,
  title={Epistemic duties and blameworthiness for belief},
  author={Christopher Todd Gadsden},
  year={2014}
}
People sometimes believe things they shouldn't. Tommy believes in Santa Claus, Rev. Jones believes that the world is ending, and Adolf believes that some ethnic groups are superior to others. But are they somehow at fault (blameworthy) for holding these 'bad' beliefs? In my dissertation, I argue that people are blameworthy for a doxastic attitude D just in case they hold D and have unfulfilled epistemic duties regarding D. An epistemic duty is a duty to investigate or reflect on the evidence… CONTINUE READING

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