Epipubic bones in eutherian mammals from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia

@article{Novacek1997EpipubicBI,
  title={Epipubic bones in eutherian mammals from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia},
  author={Michael J. Novacek and Guillermo W. Rougier and John R. Wible and Malcolm C. Mckenna and Demberelyin Dashzeveg and In{\'e}s. Horovitz},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1997},
  volume={389},
  pages={483-486}
}
An important transformation in the evolution of mammals was the loss of the epipubic bones. These are elements projecting anteriorly from the pelvic girdle into the abdominal region in a variety of Mesozoic mammals, related tritylodonts, marsupials and monotremes but not in living eutherian (placental) mammals,,. Here we describe a new eutherian from the Late Cretaceous period of Mongolia, and report the first record of epipubic bones in two distinct eutherian lineages. The presence of epipubic… 
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