Epiparasitic plants specialized on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

@article{Bidartondo2002EpiparasiticPS,
  title={Epiparasitic plants specialized on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi},
  author={Martin I. Bidartondo and Dirk Redecker and Isabelle Hijri and Andres Wiemken and Thomas D. Bruns and Laura S. Dom{\'i}nguez and Alicia N S{\'e}rsic and Jonathan R. Leake and David J. Read},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2002},
  volume={419},
  pages={389-392}
}
Over 400 non-photosynthetic species from 10 families of vascular plants obtain their carbon from fungi and are thus defined as myco-heterotrophs. Many of these plants are epiparasitic on green plants from which they obtain carbon by ‘cheating’ shared mycorrhizal fungi. Epiparasitic plants examined to date depend on ectomycorrhizal fungi for carbon transfer and exhibit exceptional specificity for these fungi, but for most myco-heterotrophs neither the identity of the fungi nor the sources of… 
Myco-heterotroph/epiparasitic plant interactions with ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.
  • J. Leake
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    Current opinion in plant biology
  • 2004
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