Epinephrine for bronchiolitis.

@article{Hartling2011EpinephrineFB,
  title={Epinephrine for bronchiolitis.},
  author={L. Hartling and L. Bialy and B. Vandermeer and L. Tjosvold and D. Johnson and A. Plint and T. Klassen and H. Patel and R. Fernandes},
  journal={The Cochrane database of systematic reviews},
  year={2011},
  volume={6},
  pages={
          CD003123
        }
}
BACKGROUND Bronchodilators are commonly used for acute bronchiolitis, despite uncertain effectiveness. OBJECTIVES To examine the efficacy and safety of epinephrine in children less than two with acute viral bronchiolitis. SEARCH STRATEGY We searched CENTRAL (2010, Issue 3) which contains the Acute Respiratory Infections Group's Specialized Register, MEDLINE (1950 to September Week 2, 2010), EMBASE (1980 to September 2010), Scopus (1823 to September 2010), PubMed (March 2010), LILACS (1985… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
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ConditionsHigh Flow Nasal Cannula
InterventionDevice
Interventional Clinical Trial
In infancy, bronchiolitis is the most common acute infection of the lower respiratory Tract. The current treatment of bronchiolitis is controversial. Bronchodilators and corticosteroids… Expand
ConditionsBronchiolitis
InterventionDrug
Bronchodilators for bronchiolitis.
TLDR
Bronchodilators such as albuterol or salbutamol do not improve oxygen saturation, do not reduce hospital admission after outpatient treatment, doNot shorten the duration of hospitalization and do not shorten the time to resolution of illness at home. Expand
Glucocorticoids for acute viral bronchiolitis in infants and young children.
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Current evidence does not support a clinically relevant effect of systemic or inhaled glucocorticoids on admissions or length of hospitalisation, but combined dexamethasone and epinephrine may reduce outpatient admissions, but results are exploratory and safety data limited. Expand
Glucocorticoids for acute viral bronchiolitis in infants and young children.
TLDR
Current evidence does not support a clinically relevant effect of systemic or inhaled glucocorticoids on admissions or length of hospitalization; combined dexamethasone and epinephrine may reduce outpatient admissions, but results are exploratory and safety data limited. Expand
Racemic adrenaline and inhalation strategies in acute bronchiolitis.
TLDR
In the treatment of acute bronchiolitis in infants, inhaled racemic adrenaline is not more effective than inhaled saline, however, the strategy of inhalation on demand appears to be superior to that of inhalations on a fixed schedule. Expand
Chest physiotherapy for acute bronchiolitis in paediatric patients between 0 and 24 months old.
TLDR
Slow passive expiratory techniques failed to show a benefit in the primary outcomes of severity status of bronchiolitis and in time to recovery, and high quality evidence that these techniques are related to an increased risk of transient respiratory destabilisation was found. Expand
The management of acute bronchiolitis in infants
TLDR
Home oxygen is increasingly being used in patients with uncomplicated bronchiolitis and on-going hypoxia as an effective way to decrease both hospital admissions and the length of hospital stay. Expand
Surfactant therapy for bronchiolitis in critically ill infants.
TLDR
Exogenous surfactant administration appears to favourably change the haemodynamics of the lungs and may be a potentially promising therapy for severe bronchiolitis and there is a need for larger trials with adequate power and a cost-effectiveness analysis. Expand
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for acute bronchiolitis in children.
TLDR
The effect of CPAP in children with acute bronchiolitis is uncertain due to the limited evidence available and larger trials with adequate power are needed to evaluate the effect. Expand
The Cochrane Library and the Treatment of Bronchiolitis in Children: An Overview of Reviews
TLDR
This updated overview of reviews aims to synthesize evidence from the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews on the effectiveness and safety of 11 pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments to improve bronchiolitis symptoms in outpatient, inpatient and intensive care populations. Expand
Leukotriene inhibitors for bronchiolitis in infants and young children.
TLDR
The effects of leukotriene inhibitors on length of hospital stay and clinical severity score were uncertain due to considerable heterogeneity between the study results and wide confidence intervals around the estimated effects. Expand
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Current evidence does not support a clinically relevant effect of systemic or inhaled glucocorticoids on admissions or length of hospitalisation, but combined dexamethasone and epinephrine may reduce outpatient admissions, but results are exploratory and safety data limited. Expand
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Background: Acute bronchiolitis is the most common lower respiratory tract infection in infants and there is no evidence that drug treatment alters its natural course. Despite this, most SwissExpand
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Nbulized epinephrine did not confer a significant advantage over nebulized saline in the emergency room treatment of acute bronchiolitis and there was no difference between treated and placebo groups in respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, heart rate or a composite respiratory distress score at 30, 60 or 120 min post‐treatment. Expand
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