Epidemiology of insect-venom anaphylaxis

@article{Bil2008EpidemiologyOI,
  title={Epidemiology of insect-venom anaphylaxis},
  author={Beatrice M Bil{\`o} and Floriano Bonifazi},
  journal={Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology},
  year={2008},
  volume={8},
  pages={330–337}
}
Purpose of review Knowledge of the epidemiology, natural history and risk factors of insect-venom allergy is crucial for improving the clinical management of allergic patients. This review focuses on the recent research on these aspects of Hymenoptera-sting anaphylactic reactions. Recent findings The latest data from population-based studies of anaphylactic reactions due to Hymenoptera stings, as well as those extrapolated from studies of epidemiology of anaphylaxis due to any cause are… Expand
The natural history and epidemiology of insect venom allergy: clinical implications
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  • 2009
TLDR
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Patients with an SA after a field sting do not have an elevated risk of systemic reactions during the initiation of venom immunotherapy compared with patients with mild anaphylaxis; therefore, additional preventive measures are not necessary. Expand
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TLDR
A global view on allergic reactions to the venoms of stinging ants and the contemporary approach to diagnose and manage ant venom allergy is provided. Expand
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  • Current Allergy and Asthma Reports
  • 2021
TLDR
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Over- and underestimated parameters in severe Hymenoptera venom-induced anaphylaxis: cardiovascular medication and absence of urticaria/angioedema.
TLDR
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TLDR
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The background of this PhD-thesis is based on the Hymenoptera venom allergy and the associated complex of problems of severe anaphylactic reactions. In general around 0.3 to 8.9% of the populationExpand
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