Epidemiology of actinic keratoses and squamous cell carcinoma.

@article{Salasche2000EpidemiologyOA,
  title={Epidemiology of actinic keratoses and squamous cell carcinoma.},
  author={Stuart J. Salasche},
  journal={Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology},
  year={2000},
  volume={42 1 Pt 2},
  pages={
          4-7
        }
}
  • S. Salasche
  • Published 2000
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article was to review the frequency, distribution, and determinants of actinic keratoses (AKs) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). METHODS A review of the literature was done. RESULTS AKs are extremely common lesions on the sun-exposed skin of Caucasian persons. The most important risk factors are a combination of genetic propensity ("fair skin phenotype") and cumulative sun exposure. Their prevalence increases with advancing age. The epidemiology of SCC is… 
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It is the opinion is that AKs are in situ intradermal squamous cell carcinomas which, in 10% of cases, can develop into invasive squamouscell carcinomas.
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TLDR
Investigating the thicknesses and degree of dysplasia of AKs contiguous with SCCs assuming these AKs represent the AKs that have undergone malignant transformation suggests malignant progression potential ofAKs regardless of thickness.
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A literature review of the clinical presentation of AK including advances in treatment options available is conducted, finding that education about sun exposure prevention remains the best and most cost‐effective method for AK prevention.
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TLDR
An AK classification system is recommended that describes these lesions as squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), using the terminology ‘ early in situ SCC Type AK I’, ‘early in situSCC type AK II’ and ‘in situ S CC Type AK III’ to give clinicians better guidance for diagnosis and specific treatment recommendations.
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Using data from a nationally representive sample of the Medicare population, this study demonstrates that elders with AK are a population at high risk of developing cutaneous cancer.
Actinic keratosis: epidemiology and progression to squamous cell carcinoma
  • M. Lebwohl
  • Medicine
    The British journal of dermatology
  • 2003
TLDR
There is strong evidence that actinic keratoses can progress to squamous cell carcinoma, underscoring the need to identify and treat patients at risk.
Actinic keratosis: a clinical and epidemiological revision.
TLDR
The authors assemble the main epidemiological data regarding this disease and suggest that strategies to identify risky phenotypes, early diagnosis, adequate treatment, clinical follow-up, stimulus to skin self examination, photoeducation and photoprotection should be promoted with the aim of avoiding the progression to malignancy.
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Options for the management of Actinic keratosis and cheilitis include surgical removal, topical treatment, and photodynamic therapy, which may be used in case of inadequate response.
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An overview on the broad spectrum of standard therapies offers an update on treatment results and side effects, and highlights the preliminary studies of sequential therapies, meant to be useful in daily practice.
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