• Corpus ID: 6874987

Epidemiological studies on brassica vegetables and cancer risk.

@article{Verhoeven1996EpidemiologicalSO,
  title={Epidemiological studies on brassica vegetables and cancer risk.},
  author={D T Verhoeven and R. Alexandra Goldbohm and Geert van Poppel and Hans Verhagen and P. A. van den Brandt},
  journal={Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers \& prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology},
  year={1996},
  volume={5 9},
  pages={
          733-48
        }
}
  • D. Verhoeven, R. Goldbohm, P. A. van den Brandt
  • Published 1 September 1996
  • Medicine
  • Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
This paper gives an overview of the epidemiological data concerning the cancer-preventive effect of brassica vegetables, including cabbage, kale, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and cauliflower. The protective effect of brassicas against cancer may be due to their relatively high content of glucosinolates. Certain hydrolysis products of glucosinolates have shown anticarcinogenic properties. The results of 7 cohort studies and 87 case-control studies on the association between brassica consumption… 

Tables from this paper

Brassica vegetables and cancer prevention. Epidemiology and mechanisms.
TLDR
It is concluded that a high consumption of brassica vegetables is associated with a decreased risk of cancer and this association appears to be most consistent for lung, stomach, colon and rectal cancer, and least consistent for prostatic, endometrial and ovarian cancer.
Brassica Vegetables and Prostate Cancer Risk: A Review of the Epidemiological Evidence
TLDR
The epidemiological literature provides modest support for the hypothesis that high intakes of Brassica vegetables reduce prostate cancer risk, and six published studies can be clearly interpreted.
Cruciferous Vegetables and Risk of Cancers of the Gastrointestinal Tract.
  • I. Johnson
  • Medicine, Biology
    Molecular nutrition & food research
  • 2018
TLDR
A literature review of primary studies and meta-analyses indicates that higher consumption of cruciferous vegetables probably reduces the risk of colorectal and gastric cancers by approximately 8% and 19%, respectively.
Cruciferous vegetable intake and the risk of human cancer: epidemiological evidence
TLDR
The current epidemiological evidence suggests that cruciferous vegetable consumption may reduce the risk only of gastric and lung cancers, and there is at present no conclusive evidence that the consumption of crucifierous vegetables attenuates the risk of all other cancers.
Evaluation of glucosinolate levels throughout the production chain of Brassica vegetables
TLDR
It was demonstrated that many steps in the food production chain of Brassica vegetables or vegetable products can affect the final intake of health-protective glucosinolates and breakdown products for humans and a novel predictive modelling approach was proposed to handle the variations in the production chain.
Brassica, biotransformation and cancer risk: genetic polymorphisms alter the preventive effects of cruciferous vegetables.
The chemoprotective effect of cruciferous vegetables is due to their high glucosinolate content and the capacity of glucosinolate metabolites, such as isothiocyanates (ITC) and indoles, to modulate
Cruciferous Vegetables (Indole-3-Carbinol, Isothiocyanates) Against Cancer
TLDR
The present chapter aims to summarise the available literature providing the evidence for the use of bioactive compounds from cruciferous vegetables as chemo-protective agents, focusing the attention on the main representative phytochemicals belonging to this group, such as indole-3-carbinol and isothiocyanates.
Cruciferous Vegetables: Cancer Protective Mechanisms of Glucosinolate Hydrolysis Products and Selenium
TLDR
The anticarcinogenic bioactivities of glucosinolate hydrolysis products, the mineral selenium derived from crucifers, and the mechanisms by which they protect against cancer are described.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 145 REFERENCES
Vegetable and fruit consumption in relation to prostate cancer risk in Hawaii: a reevaluation of the effect of dietary beta-carotene.
TLDR
Results suggest that: 1) the positive association with beta-carotene intake among older men that the authors previously reported was essentially due to the greater papaya consumption of cases compared with controls; and 2) intake of beta- carotene, lycopene, lutein, indoles, phenols, or other phytochemicals is not associated with prostate cancer risk.
Effects of consumption of Brussels sprouts on intestinal and lymphocytic glutathione S-transferases in humans
TLDR
In conclusion, consumption of glucosinolate-containing Brussels sprouts for 1 week results in increased rectal GST-α and -π isozyme levels, and it is hypothesized that these enhanced detoxification enzyme levels may partly explain the epidemiological association between a high intake of glucose-containing vegetables and a decreased risk of colorectal cancer.
Increased green and yellow vegetable intake and lowered cancer deaths in an elderly population.
TLDR
The trend of decreased cancer risk with increasing intake of carotenes containing vegetables was significant and consistent with the hypothesis that carotene may act as an inhibitor of carcinogenesis.
Consumption of foods and micronutrients and the risk of cancer of the biliary tract.
TLDR
The protective effect of vegetables is in accordance with the reported inverse relationship between vegetables and many epithelial cancers of the alimentary tract, and added sugar may influence bile composition through lipoprotein metabolism.
Fruit, vegetables, and cancer prevention: a review of the epidemiological evidence.
TLDR
It would appear that major public health benefits could be achieved by substantially increasing consumption of fruit and vegetable consumption, and in particular in cancers of the esophagus, oral cavity, and larynx, for which 28 of 29 studies were significant.
Food‐group consumption and colon cancer in the adelaide case‐control study. I. Vegetables and fruit
TLDR
A case‐control study in Australia comparing 220 persons with histologically confirmed incident adenocarcinoma of the colon with 438 age‐ and gender‐matched controls showed no strong and consistent differences between sub‐sites for the vegetable and fruit associations.
Diet and thyroid cancer: A pooled analysis of four european case‐control studies
TLDR
The relationship between frequencies of consumption of selected indicator foods and the risk of thyroid cancer was investigated in a pooled analysis of 4 case‐control studies conducted in 3 areas of northern Italy and the Swiss Canton of Vaud and results were consistent and reproducible across various study centers.
Vegetables, fruit, and colon cancer in the Iowa Women's Health Study.
TLDR
Results from a prospective cohort study of 41,837 women aged 55-69 years who completed a 127-item food frequency questionnaire in 1986 and were monitored for cancer incidence for 5 years are described.
A case‐control study of diet and gastric cancer in Northern Italy
Dietary factors in the aetiology of stomach cancer were investigated using data from a case‐control study conducted in Northern Italy on 206 histologically confirmed carcinomas and 474 control
Dietary vitamins A and C and lung cancer risk in louisiana
TLDR
An inverse association was found between level of carotene intake and lung cancer risk, and this protective effect was specific for squamous and small cell carcinoma.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...