Epidemiologic Evidence on Coffee and Cancer

@article{Arab2010EpidemiologicEO,
  title={Epidemiologic Evidence on Coffee and Cancer},
  author={Lenore Arab},
  journal={Nutrition and Cancer},
  year={2010},
  volume={62},
  pages={271 - 283}
}
  • L. Arab
  • Published 31 March 2010
  • Medicine
  • Nutrition and Cancer
Coffee consumption is a major and frequent dietary exposure in diverse cultures around the globe whose safety has been questioned. A substantial body of epidemiologic evidence, consisting of over 500 papers relating the consumption of coffee to cancer of various sites, has accumulated to date. Numerous individual, site-specific meta analyses have been undertaken at various times. However, there is no comprehensive, up-to-date overview of the entirety of the knowledge base. To address this need… 

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In this large US cohort, coffee was inversely associated with colon cancer, particularly proximal tumors, and although individual HRs were not significant, there was a significant P-trend for both colon and rectal cancers for people who drank predominantly decaffeinated coffee.

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Results from this prospective study showed no relationship between coffee, tea or caffeine intake and breast cancer risk overall or by hormone receptor status.

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References

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Coffee consumption and the risk of endometrial cancer: Evidence from a case‐control study of female hormone‐related cancers in Japan

It is suggested that coffee consumption reduces the risk of endometrial cancer in Japanese subjects, and the scarcity of studies of coffee intake and endometricrial cancer and other hormone‐dependent cancer risk is warranted.

Intake of Coffee and Tea and Risk of Ovarian Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study

Given the pervasive use of these beverages, the associations between coffee and tea consumption and ovarian cancer risk warrant investigation in further prospective studies.

Coffee consumption and risk of liver cancer: a meta-analysis.

Findings from this meta-analysis suggest that an increased consumption of coffee may reduce the risk of liver cancer.

Alcohol, coffee, and bladder cancer risk: a review of epidemiological studies.

  • C. PelucchiC. la Vecchia
  • Medicine
    European journal of cancer prevention : the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation
  • 2009
Analysis of epidemiological studies that evaluated the association between consumption of coffee and alcohol and urinary bladder cancer found a moderate increase in risk in coffee drinkers as compared with nondrinkers, but no trend with dose has been established.

Dietary Factors in Relation to Endometrial Cancer: A Nationwide Case-Control Study in Sweden

No clear association between foods or food groups and endometrial cancer risk is found, although high consumption of certain foods, such as Brassica vegetables, coffee, and legumes, might be associated with small-to-moderate reduced risks of endometricrial cancer, while red meat consumption might beassociated with a small- to-moderate increased risk.

Food groups and endometrial cancer risk: a case-control study from Italy.

Green tea and coffee intake and risk of pancreatic cancer in a large-scale, population-based cohort study in Japan (JPHC study)

  • Juhua LuoM. Inoue S. Tsugane
  • Medicine
    European journal of cancer prevention : the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation
  • 2007
The idea that green tea or coffee consumption does not have a substantial impact on pancreatic cancer risk in general is supported.

Consumption of coffee, but not black tea, is associated with decreased risk of premenopausal breast cancer.

Findings support a protective effect of coffee intake on premenopausal, but not postmenopausal breast cancer risk, and no clear associations between intake of black tea or decaffeinated coffee and Breast cancer risk were noted among premenographic women.

Consumption of black tea or coffee and risk of ovarian cancer

The chemoprotective effects of phytochemicals in black tea and decaffeinated coffee may be important, although the effects ofPhytochemicalicals in regular coffee may been counteracted by the elevated risk associated with its higher caffeine content.

Intakes of coffee, tea, milk, soda and juice and renal cell cancer in a pooled analysis of 13 prospective studies

Findings provide strong evidence that neither coffee nor tea consumption increases renal cell cancer risk and, instead, greater consumption of coffee and tea may be associated with a lower risk of renalcell cancer.
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