Epidemic Disease and the Catastrophic Decline of Australian Rain Forest Frogs

@article{Laurance1996EpidemicDA,
  title={Epidemic Disease and the Catastrophic Decline of Australian Rain Forest Frogs},
  author={W. Laurance and K. Mcdonald and R. Speare},
  journal={Conservation Biology},
  year={1996},
  volume={10},
  pages={406-413}
}
In the montane rain forests of eastern Australia at least 14 species of endemic, stream-dwelling frogs have disappeared or declined sharply (by more than 90%) during the past 15 years. We review available information on these declines and present eight lines of evidence that collectively suggest that a rapidly spreading, epidemic disease is the most likely responsible agent. The extreme virulence of the putative frog patbogen suggests it is likely exotic to Australian rain forests. We propose… Expand
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