Eosinophilic meningitis due to Angiostrongylus and Gnathostoma species.

@article{RamirezAvila2009EosinophilicMD,
  title={Eosinophilic meningitis due to Angiostrongylus and Gnathostoma species.},
  author={Lynn Ramirez-Avila and Sally B Slome and Frederick L. Schuster and Shilpa S. Gavali and Peter M. Schantz and James Sejvar and Carol Ann Glaser},
  journal={Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America},
  year={2009},
  volume={48 3},
  pages={
          322-7
        }
}
  • L. Ramirez-Avila, S. Slome, +4 authors C. Glaser
  • Published 1 February 2009
  • Medicine
  • Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
Eosinophilic meningitis can be the result of noninfectious causes and infectious agents. Among the infectious agents, Angiostrongylus cantonensis and Gnathostoma spinigerum are the most common. Although angiostrongyliasis and gnathostomiasis are not common in the United States, international travel and immigration make these diseases clinically relevant. Both A. cantonensis and G. spinigerum infection can present as severe CNS compromise. Diagnoses of both infections can be challenging and are… Expand
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