Eocene lizard from Germany reveals amphisbaenian origins

@article{Mller2011EoceneLF,
  title={Eocene lizard from Germany reveals amphisbaenian origins},
  author={Johannes M{\"u}ller and Christy A. Hipsley and Jason J. Head and Nikolay Kardjilov and Andr{\'e} Hilger and Michael Wuttke and Robert R. Reisz},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2011},
  volume={473},
  pages={364-367}
}
Amphisbaenia is a speciose clade of fossorial lizards characterized by a snake-like body and a strongly reinforced skull adapted for head-first burrowing. The evolutionary origins of amphisbaenians are controversial, with molecular data uniting them with lacertids, a clade of Old World terrestrial lizards, whereas morphology supports a grouping with snakes and other limbless squamates. Reports of fossil stem amphisbaenians have been falsified, and no fossils have previously tested these… 
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