Enzymic analysis of microbial pattern and process

@article{Sinsabaugh2004EnzymicAO,
  title={Enzymic analysis of microbial pattern and process},
  author={R. S. Sinsabaugh},
  journal={Biology and Fertility of Soils},
  year={2004},
  volume={17},
  pages={69-74}
}
Enzyme assays, once used primarily to collect descriptive information about soils, have become useful techniques for monitoring microbial activity and uncovering the mechanisms that underlie microbial processes. The simplest paradigm is that decomposition and nutrient cycling are emergent consequences of extracellular enzyme activities that are regulated directly by site-specific factors such as temperature, moisture and nutrient availability, and secondarily by litter chemistry through… Expand

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