Enzootic plague reduces black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) survival in Montana.

@article{Matchett2010EnzooticPR,
  title={Enzootic plague reduces black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) survival in Montana.},
  author={Marc R. Matchett and Dean E. Biggins and Valerie Carlson and Bradford S Powell and Tonie E. Rocke},
  journal={Vector borne and zoonotic diseases},
  year={2010},
  volume={10 1},
  pages={
          27-35
        }
}
Black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) require extensive prairie dog colonies (Cynomys spp.) to provide habitat and prey. Epizootic plague kills both prairie dogs and ferrets and is a major factor limiting recovery of the highly endangered ferret. In addition to epizootics, we hypothesized that enzootic plague, that is, presence of disease-causing Yersinia pestis without any noticeable prairie dog die off, may also affect ferret survival. We reduced risk of plague on portions of two ferret… 

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