Environmental tobacco smoke and tobacco related mortality in a prospective study of Californians, 1960-98

@article{Enstrom2003EnvironmentalTS,
  title={Environmental tobacco smoke and tobacco related mortality in a prospective study of Californians, 1960-98},
  author={James E. Enstrom and Geoffrey C Kabat and Davey M. Smith},
  journal={BMJ : British Medical Journal},
  year={2003},
  volume={326},
  pages={1057}
}
Abstract Objective To measure the relation between environmental tobacco smoke, as estimated by smoking in spouses, and long term mortality from tobacco related disease. Design Prospective cohort study covering 39 years. Setting Adult population of California, United States. Participants 118 094 adults enrolled in late 1959 in the American Cancer Society cancer prevention study (CPS I), who were followed until 1998. Particular focus is on the 35 561 never smokers who had a spouse in the study… 

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