Environmental policy and children's health.

@article{Landrigan1995EnvironmentalPA,
  title={Environmental policy and children's health.},
  author={Philip J. Landrigan and J E Carlson},
  journal={The Future of children},
  year={1995},
  volume={5 2},
  pages={
          34-52
        }
}
Understanding the differences in the effects of environmental contamination on children and adults is an important part of environmental policymaking; however, unless environmental health policies reflect the differences between adults and children, this knowledge will have little practical effect. The authors of this article consider how the unique vulnerabilities of children challenge environmental policymaking. First, they review the biological differences between children and adults, and… 
Children's health and the environment.
TLDR
The scientific basis for the impacts of the environment on children is presented, and the differences between adults and children in physical, biological, and social environments are described, and why children should not be treated as “little adults” in developing environmental policy are highlighted.
Children's health and the environment: public health issues and challenges for risk assessment.
TLDR
The adequate protection of children against toxic agents in the environment will require fundamental and far-reaching revisions of current approaches to toxicity testing and risk assessment.
Children and other high-risk workers as a special challenge to occupational health services
TLDR
To protect infants and children against toxicants, fundamental revisions to current approaches are required and the central elements are improved quantitative assessment of children's exposures, the development of new approaches to toxicity testing, and the application of conservative uncertainty and safety factors in risk assessment that specifically considers children’s risks.
A qualitative analysis of environmental policy and children's health in Mexico
TLDR
The Mexican government has not sufficiently accounted for children's unique vulnerability to environmental contaminants and increases in preventable exposures to toxic chemicals in the environment may ensue if regulation and legislation are not updated and implemented to protect children.
Protecting children from chemical exposure: social work and U.S. social welfare policy.
TLDR
The adequacy of national social welfare and environmental policies is assessed and policy-level interventions are recommended to address the unique vulnerability of children--especially children who are poor and children of color-to toxic chemicals.
Risk Assessment for Children and Other Sensitive Populations
  • P. Landrigan
  • Medicine
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • 1999
TLDR
Adoption of a new child‐centered agenda for research and risk assessment is necessary if disease in children of toxic environmental origin is to be identified, understood, controlled, and prevented and this agenda needs to be multidisciplinary.
Children's health and the environment: a new agenda for prevention research.
TLDR
To prevent disease of environmental origin in America's children, the Children's Environmental Health Network (CEHN) calls for a comprehensive, national, child-centered agenda and for creation of a national network of pediatric environmental health research and prevention centers.
The Sentinel Role of Poisons Centers in the Protection of Children's Environmental Health
TLDR
Poisons Centers and related toxicology centers are in a strategic position to play a “sentinel” role in the protection of children's environmental health, and record acute and chronic toxic exposures in children in a harmonized manner, to collect a large, highly valuable database on the main toxicological problems affecting children, including those of environmental origin.
The sentinel role of poisons centers in the protection of children's environmental health.
TLDR
The main global environmental problems affecting children's health are lack of access to safe drinking water and sanitation and exposure to indoor air pollution and environmentally related accidents, injuries, and poisonings.
Child health in an urbanizing world
TLDR
The aim of this study is to document and comment on the effects of urbanization on child health, internationally, using published reports and the author's personal experience to understand and work towards minimizing their harmful effects on children.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 39 REFERENCES
Hazardous Wastes, Hazardous Materials and Environmental Health Inequity
TLDR
Developing environmental policies that address environmental inequity; conducting detailed demographic and health studies that assess the impact of exposure to toxic waste on minority populations; and devising educational programs to sensitize professional service providers and prevent exposure by community residents are recommended.
Children and toxic substances: confronting a major public health challenge.
  • M. Schaefer
  • Medicine
    Environmental health perspectives
  • 1994
TLDR
The Federal government should expand toxicological testing programs for existing and new chemicals, requiring increased developmental toxicological, particularly neurotoxicological, testing of chemicals to which the public is significantly exposed.
Impediments to the Implementation of Environmental Policy
  • B. Walker
  • Political Science
    Journal of public health policy
  • 1994
TLDR
As the executive and legislative branches of the federal government try within the next four years to settle and move beyond a number of large environmental health and ecological issues, they must be constantly alerted to the limitations inherent in the implementation phase of the policy process.
Science and Judgement in Risk Assessment
TLDR
The author examines the reasons for lack of accurate data about the prevalence of food allergy and concludes that well controlled population based prospective studies are required to shed light about problems related to food allergy.
Quantitative Risk Assessment: A Tool to Be Used Responsibly
  • J. Millar
  • Medicine
    Journal of public health policy
  • 1992
TLDR
This term specifically identifies a sophisticated statistical estimate of the risk of a particular untoward health event, usually cancer, as the result of a specified exposure to a toxic chemical or physical agent.
The long-term effects of exposure to low doses of lead in childhood. An 11-year follow-up report.
TLDR
Exposure to lead in childhood is associated with deficits in central nervous system functioning that persist into young adulthood, and lead levels were inversely related to self-reports of minor delinquent activity.
The decline in blood lead levels in the United States. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES)
TLDR
A substantial decline in blood lead levels is demonstrated of the entire US population and within selected subgroups of the population and similar declines were found in population subgroups defined by age, sex, race/ethnicity, income level, and urban status.
The recognition and control of occupational disease.
TLDR
A program for the control of occupational disease based on preventing exposures in the workplace, premarket toxicity testing of new chemicals and technologies, and astute clinical diagnosis is outlined.
Longitudinal analyses of prenatal and postnatal lead exposure and early cognitive development.
TLDR
It appears that the fetus may be adversely affected at blood lead concentrations well below 25 micrograms per deciliter, the level currently defined by the Centers for Disease Control as the highest acceptable level for young children.
...
1
2
3
4
...