Environmental margin and island evolution in Middle Eastern populations of the Egyptian fruit bat

@article{Hulva2012EnvironmentalMA,
  title={Environmental margin and island evolution in Middle Eastern populations of the Egyptian fruit bat},
  author={Pavel Hulva and Tereza Mare{\vs}ov{\'a} and Heliana Dundarova and Raşit Bilgin and Petr Benda and Tom{\'a}{\vs} Bartoni{\vc}ka and Ivan Hor{\'a}{\vc}ek},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2012},
  volume={21}
}
Here, we present a study of the population genetic architecture and microevolution of the Egyptian fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus) at the environmental margins in the Middle East using mitochondrial sequences and nuclear microsatellites. [] Key Result In contrast to the rather homogenous population structure typical of cave-dwelling bats in climax tropical ecosystems, a relatively pronounced isolation by distance and population diversification was observed.
Habitat use, but not gene flow, is influenced by human activities in two ecotypes of Egyptian fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus)
TLDR
A positive effect of human‐altered habitats on patch occupancy and habitat use of fruit bats is found by increasing the availability of roosting and foraging areas and an isolation‐by‐resistance approach to model gene flow patterns is used.
Reproductive seasonality of the Egyptian fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus) at the northern limits of its distribution
TLDR
It is hypothesized that food abundance is an important trigger of male sexual activity in the Egyptian fruit bat, the sole species with seasonal bimodal polyestry among Palearctic bats.
Molecular and morphometric characterization of fruit bats of the genus Rousettus Gray, 1821 (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae) in Iran
TLDR
The result showed very low genetic variation between different populations of R. leschenaultii throughout its range in the Palaearctic and Indo-Malayan realms.
Seasonal challenges of tropical bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) in temperate zones
TLDR
It is hypothesized that R.aegyptiacus, a fruit-bat of tropical origin is facing major seasonal difficulties near the northern edge of its distribution, probably limiting its further spread northward.
Bat remains (Mammalia, Chiroptera) from the Middle Pleistocene site of Qesem Cave, Israel, with the first Pleistocene record of fruit bats in the Mediterranean region
Very few data are available on fossil bats of the Near East, a region of great biogeographic significance for that group in the Western Palaearctic. Here, we report on a collection of fossil bats
Pan African phylogeography and palaeodistribution of rousettine fruit bats: Ecogeographic correlation with Pleistocene climate vegetation cycles
TLDR
Palaeodistributional modelling ascertained that the Indian Ocean islands provided more extensive areas of suitable habitat in the past relative to conditions today, suggesting stepping stone connectivity between Asia and Africa during Pleistocene interpluvial sea‐level lowstands.
Bats from Lebanon at the Natural History Museum, Vienna: a cautionary tale on the reliability of museum specimen data (Chiroptera)
Abstract Seven historical bat specimens of four species (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, R. mehelyi, Taphozous nudiventris, Myotis myotis), attributed to originate from the territory of the present-day
First record of the Egyptian fruit bat, Rousettus aegyptiacus (Pteropodidae), from Kastellorizo island, Greece
TLDR
The first record of the Egyptian fruit bat in Greek territory is presented, observed during a zoological expedition on the island of Kastellorizo (Dodecanese, Greece).
Spatial activity and feeding ecology of the endangered northern population of the Egyptian fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus)
TLDR
Active conservation management of Cypriot fruit bats should include the construction of artificial water sources in the vicinity of fruit orchards, but also controversial practices such as supporting the occurrence of particular nonnative plant species, thereby enhancing food availability in critical times of the year.
Genetic identification of bat species for pathogen surveillance across France
TLDR
The findings demonstrate the importance of a genetic approach as an efficient and reliable method to identify bat species precisely and allow the identification of 24 out of 25 morphologically non-determined bat samples.
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