Environmental conditions and male morphology determine alternative mating behaviour in Trinidadian guppies

@article{Reynolds1993EnvironmentalCA,
  title={Environmental conditions and male morphology determine alternative mating behaviour in Trinidadian guppies},
  author={John D. Reynolds and Martr . Gross and Mark J. Coombs},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1993},
  volume={45},
  pages={145-152}
}
. Individual male guppies (Poecilia reticulata: Poeciliinae) exhibit two distinct types of mating behaviour: sigmoid displays used in courtship, and gonopodial thrusts used in circumventing female choice. To test how these alternatives are influenced by sexual selection and natural selection, ambient light levels were manipulated to vary potential predation risk, and mating behaviour was examined in relation to male morphology. At high light intensity, larger males displayed significantly less… Expand
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