Environmental Sensing Options for Robot Teams: A Computational Complexity Perspective

@article{Wareham2022EnvironmentalSO,
  title={Environmental Sensing Options for Robot Teams: A Computational Complexity Perspective},
  author={Todd Wareham and Andrew Vardy},
  journal={ArXiv},
  year={2022},
  volume={abs/2205.05034}
}
: Visual and scalar-field (e.g., chemical) sensing are two of the options robot teams can use to perceive their environments when performing tasks. We give the first comparison of the computational characteristic of visual and scalar-field sensing, phrased in terms of the computational complexities of verifying and designing teams of robots to efficiently and robustly perform distributed construction tasks. This is done relative a basic model in which teams of robots with deterministic finite-state… 

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