Environmental Inequality: The Social Causes and Consequences of Lead Exposure

@article{Muller2018EnvironmentalIT,
  title={Environmental Inequality: The Social Causes and Consequences of Lead Exposure},
  author={Christopher Muller and Robert J. Sampson and Alix S Winter},
  journal={Annual Review of Sociology},
  year={2018}
}
In this article, we review evidence from the social and medical sciences on the causes and effects of lead exposure. We argue that lead exposure is an important subject for sociological analysis because it is socially stratified and has important social consequences—consequences that themselves depend in part on children's social environments. We present a model of environmental inequality over the life course to guide an agenda for future research. We conclude with a call for deeper exchange… Expand
Corporealising a Healthy Democracy? Inequality, Bodies and Participation
ABSTRACT Socio-economic inequality is associated with differentiated levels of health and poor health affects political participation; inequalities are embodied in political life. This contribution,Expand
Quantification of Neighborhood-Level Social Determinants of Health in the Continental United States
TLDR
The use of multidimensional geospatial approaches to quantify social determinants of health rather than the use of a singular deprivation index may better capture the complexity and spatial heterogeneity underlying these determinants. Expand
POISONED DEVELOPMENT: ASSESSING CHILDHOOD LEAD EXPOSURE AS A CAUSE OF CRIME IN A BIRTH COHORT FOLLOWED THROUGH ADOLESCENCE
The consequences of lead exposure for later crime are theoretically compelling, but direct evidence from representative, longitudinal samples is sparse. By capitalizing on an original follow-up ofExpand
Neighbourhood effects and beyond: Explaining the paradoxes of inequality in the changing American metropolis
American cities today are simultaneously the same and different from Wilson’s classic portrayal in The Truly Disadvantaged ([1987] 2012), first published over 30 years ago. Concentrated poverty andExpand
Gentrification and Academic Achievement: A Review of Recent Research
Research in the neighborhood effects tradition has primarily concerned itself with understanding the consequences of growing up in high-poverty neighborhoods. In recent years, however, theExpand
Childhood exposure to polluted neighborhood environments and intergenerational income mobility, teenage birth, and incarceration in the USA
This paper joins a growing body of research linking measures of the physical environment to population well-being, with a focus on neighborhood toxins. Extending a national database on the socialExpand
An Integrated Data System Lens Into Evictions and Their Effects
ABSTRACT This study uses linked administrative records to examine the disruptive effects of eviction on adults and children in low-income households. By linking eviction filings for the City ofExpand
Social factors shaping the adoption of lead-filtering point-of-use systems: an observational study of an MTurk sample.
TLDR
Race and SES are indirectly predictive of lead-filtering POU adoption through the propensity of some respondents to report a residence with a lead service line and levels of concern and knowledge about lead exposure, and these findings inform health policies aimed at mitigating risk of lead exposure through water. Expand
Early-Life Circumstances and Their Effects Over the Life Course
The idea that early-life circumstances shape people’s health, development, and well-being over the life course has gained renewed centrality in the last two decades. This renewed interest has beenExpand
Association of lead-exposure risk and family income with childhood brain outcomes
TLDR
Cross-sectional analysis of data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study shows that children from families with low income are at increased risk of cognitive impairment associated with high lead-exposure risk when compared with children with high income. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 94 REFERENCES
Understanding the cumulative impacts of inequalities in environmental health: implications for policy.
TLDR
Current environmental policy should be broadened to take into account the cumulative impact of exposures and vulnerabilities encountered by people who live in neighborhoods consisting largely of racial or ethnic minorities or people of low socioeconomic status. Expand
Inequality at Birth: Some Causes and Consequences
Recent research shows that health at birth is affected by many factors, including maternal education, behaviors, and participation in social programs. In turn, endowments at birth are predictive ofExpand
Social Structure, Adversity, Toxic Stress, and Intergenerational Poverty: An Early Childhood Model
Why are children of poor parents more likely to be poor as adults than other children? Early-childhood adversities resulting from social structures and relationships impact children's bodily systemsExpand
RACE AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF SOCIAL AND PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTAL RISK
TLDR
This work applies and extends Du Bois’s approach to examine the contemporary distribution of physical environmental exposures, health risks, and social vulnerabilities in the Detroit metropolitan area and quantitatively identifies communities that experience disproportionate cumulative risk. Expand
THE RACIAL ECOLOGY OF LEAD POISONING
Abstract This paper examines the racial ecology of lead exposure as a form of environmental inequity, one with both historical and contemporary significance. Drawing on comprehensive data from overExpand
SEGREGATION AND STRATIFICATION: A Biosocial Perspective
  • D. Massey
  • Sociology
  • Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race
  • 2004
Thirty years after the civil rights era, the United States remains a residentially segregated society in which Blacks and Whites inhabit different neighborhoods of vastly different quality. GivenExpand
Understanding international crime trends: the legacy of preschool lead exposure.
  • R. Nevin
  • History, Political Science
  • Environmental research
  • 2007
TLDR
Regression analysis of average 1985-1994 murder rates across USA cities suggests that murder could be especially associated with more severe cases of childhood lead poisoning, and the impact of blood lead is also evident in age-specific arrest and incarceration trends. Expand
Neighborhoods and violent crime: a multilevel study of collective efficacy.
TLDR
Multilevel analyses showed that a measure of collective efficacy yields a high between-neighborhood reliability and is negatively associated with variations in violence, when individual-level characteristics, measurement error, and prior violence are controlled. Expand
POISONED DEVELOPMENT: ASSESSING CHILDHOOD LEAD EXPOSURE AS A CAUSE OF CRIME IN A BIRTH COHORT FOLLOWED THROUGH ADOLESCENCE
The consequences of lead exposure for later crime are theoretically compelling, but direct evidence from representative, longitudinal samples is sparse. By capitalizing on an original follow-up ofExpand
Considering Lead Poisoning as a Criminal Defense
This essay reports the results of the 'Biosocial Study,' one of this country's largest longitudinal' studies of biological, sociological, and environmental predictors of crime. The Biosocial Study isExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...