Entraining IDyOT: Timing in the Information Dynamics of Thinking

@article{Forth2016EntrainingIT,
  title={Entraining IDyOT: Timing in the Information Dynamics of Thinking},
  author={Jamie Forth and Kat R. Agres and Matthew Purver and Geraint A. Wiggins},
  journal={Frontiers in Psychology},
  year={2016},
  volume={7}
}
We present a novel hypothetical account of entrainment in music and language, in context of the Information Dynamics of Thinking model, IDyOT. The extended model affords an alternative view of entrainment, and its companion term, pulse, from earlier accounts. The model is based on hierarchical, statistical prediction, modeling expectations of both what an event will be and when it will happen. As such, it constitutes a kind of predictive coding, with a particular novel hypothetical… 

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