Entomogenous Fusarium species

@article{TeetorBarsch2004EntomogenousFS,
  title={Entomogenous Fusarium species},
  author={Gertrud H. Teetor-Barsch and Donald W. Roberts},
  journal={Mycopathologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={84},
  pages={3-16}
}
Fusarium species are known for their abundance in nature and their diverse associations with both living and dead plants and animals. Among animals Fusarium is found primarily in relationship with insects. This literature review of the past 50 years includes both non-pathogenic and pathogenic relationships between Fusarium and insects. Special attention is given to the host range, particularly between plant- and insecthosts, and to the possible microbial potential of the fungus to control… 

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References

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The species concept in Fusarium with reference to section Martiella.

TLDR
One who is confronted with the task of identifying a member of section Martiella must compare his fungus with the two genera, five species, ten varieties and four forms established in the above (and only) taxonomic treatment heretofore available for this section.

THE SPECIES CONCEPT IN FUSARIUM WITH REFERENCE TO SECTION MARTIELLA

TLDR
One who is confronted with the task of identifying a member of section Martiella must compare his fungus with the two genera, five species, ten varieties and four forms established in the above (and only) taxonomic treatment heretofore available for this section.

The pathogenicity of Fusarium oxysporum to mosquito larvae.

FUNGUS DISEASES AFFECTING ADELGES PICEAE IN THE FIR FOREST OF THE GASPÉ PENINSULA, QUEBEC

TLDR
A variety of external factors made it impossible to determine accurately the degree of virulence of these fungi for Adelges, but F .

Ability of the house fly, Musca domestica, to ingest and transmit viable spores of selected fungi.

TLDR
Qualitative studies showed that the passage of fungal spores through the digestive tract did not appear to alter either the physical appearance of the spores or their ability to germinate.

Screening for mycotoxins with larvae of Tenebrio molitor.

Sterol Metabolism as a Basis for a Mutualistic Symbiosis

TLDR
Evidence is reported that the mutualistic fungus Fusarium solani associated with the beetle produced ergosterol as its only sterol in pure culture on a chemically defined substrate in sterile conditions, which proved to be adequate as the sole sterol source for continued growth, development and reproduction of the fungus-free beetle.
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