Enrichment and aggression in primates

@article{Honess2006EnrichmentAA,
  title={Enrichment and aggression in primates},
  author={P. Honess and C. Marin},
  journal={Neuroscience \& Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={2006},
  volume={30},
  pages={413-436}
}
  • P. Honess, C. Marin
  • Published 2006
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
There is considerable evidence that primates housed under impoverished conditions develop behavioural abnormalities, including, in the most extreme example, self-harming behaviour. This has implications for all contexts in which primates are maintained in captivity from laboratories to zoos since by compromising the animals' psychological well-being and allowing them to develop behavioural abnormalities their value as appropriate educational and research models is diminished. This review… Expand
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