English Variety for the Public Domain in Kenya: Speakers' Attitudes and Views

@article{Kioko2003EnglishVF,
  title={English Variety for the Public Domain in Kenya: Speakers' Attitudes and Views},
  author={A. Kioko and M. Muthwii},
  journal={Language, Culture and Curriculum},
  year={2003},
  volume={16},
  pages={130 - 145}
}
  • A. Kioko, M. Muthwii
  • Published 2003
  • Sociology
  • Language, Culture and Curriculum
  • The study sought to establish the attitudes of Kenyan speakers (n = 210) towards three varieties of English: (1) ethnically marked Kenyan English, (2) standard Kenyan English and (3) native speaker English (British, American, Australian, etc). Of the three varieties, the most preferred by both rural and urban respondents for use in the media and education was standard Kenyan English. Most of the respondents also considered this as the variety used by successful professionals like lawyers… CONTINUE READING
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