English Government Borrowing, 1660-1688

@article{Nichols1971EnglishGB,
  title={English Government Borrowing, 1660-1688},
  author={Glenn O. Nichols},
  journal={Journal of British Studies},
  year={1971},
  volume={10},
  pages={83 - 104}
}
  • Glenn O. Nichols
  • Published 1 May 1971
  • Economics, History
  • Journal of British Studies
Borrowing was a necessary and important part of government finance during the period from 1660 to 1688. During Charles II's reign, over twelve per cent of the government's receipts were loans paid directly into the Exchequer and, during some years, loans made up as much as one-third of the total receipts. Clearly borrowing was essential. Anticipatory borrowing, for instance, was necessitated by the very nature of government finance. With the exception of the scheduled payments made by private… 
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