Energy use by Eem Neanderthals

@article{Sorensen2009EnergyUB,
  title={Energy use by Eem Neanderthals},
  author={B. Sorensen},
  journal={Journal of Archaeological Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={36},
  pages={2201-2205}
}
  • B. Sorensen
  • Published 2009
  • Geography
  • Journal of Archaeological Science
  • An analysis of energy use by Neanderthals in Northern Europe during the mild Eem interglacial period is carried out with consideration of the metabolic energy production required for compensating energy losses during sleep, at daily settlement activities and during hunting expeditions, including transport of food from slain animals back to the settlement. Additional energy sources for heat, security and cooking are derived from fireplaces in the open or within shelters such as caves or huts… CONTINUE READING
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