Energy metabolism of arthropods and mollusks during environmental and functional anaerobiosis

@article{Gde1983EnergyMO,
  title={Energy metabolism of arthropods and mollusks during environmental and functional anaerobiosis},
  author={Gerd G{\"a}de},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Zoology},
  year={1983},
  volume={228},
  pages={415-429}
}
  • G. Gäde
  • Published 1 December 1983
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • Journal of Experimental Zoology
During environmental anaerobiosis, when the whole organism is exposed to anoxic conditions caused by external, physical factors in the microhabitat, arginine phosphate, glycogen, and aspartate (only mollusks) are the substrates for the metabolism. Main end products formed are lactate (Crustacea, Xiphosura, some Gastropoda and Bivalvia), alanine, succinate, and the volatile fatty acids, propionate and acetate (most Gastropoda and most Bivalvia). Because of reduction of the overall metabolism in… 
STRATEGIES OF ANAEROBIOSIS IN NEW ZEALAND INFAUNAL BIVALVES : ADAPTATIONS TO ENVIRONMENTAL AND FUNCTIONAL HYPOXIA
TLDR
Bivalves adapted to environmental hypoxia maintained high adenylate energy charge (AEC) under anaerobiosis, indicating a close matching of ATP production to consumption in slowly burrowing bivalves.
Respiratory physiology of the Oniscidea: aerobic capacity and the significance of pleopodal lungs.
The anaerobic molluscan heart: adaptation to environmental anoxia. Comparison with energy metabolism in vertebrate hearts.
  • G. GädeW. Ellington
  • Biology, Environmental Science
    Comparative biochemistry and physiology. A, Comparative physiology
  • 1983
Recovery after anaerobic metabolism in the leech (Hirudo medicinalis L.)
Medicinal leeches (Hirudo medicinalis L.) responded to self-induced hypoxia (72 h) with typical anaerobic metabolism characterized by a decrease in adenylate energy charge, utilization of the
Metabolic adaptations by the leech Nephelopsis obscura during long-term anoxia and recovery
Metabolic adaptations to long-term (40 day) anoxia were determined in two size groups (small and large) of the freshwater leech Nephelopsis obscura. Neither size group accumulated the lactic acid
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