Energy cost of running in young and adult female athletes.

Abstract

Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max.kg-1) and energy cost of running were determined on the treadmill in groups of differently trained young and adult athletes. The VO2 max.kg-1 was in all cases higher in adults than in young athletes. These differences were significant (p < 0.05) in long-distance runners (n = 12, mean age = 24.2 +/- 2.2 vs 17.3 +/- 0.9 yrs, mean VO2 max.kg-1 = 66.9 +/- 4.2 vs 58.2 +/- 4.3 ml.min-1.kg-1), and in middle-distance runners (10, 22.9 +/- 2.8 vs 16, 16.6 +/- 0.8, 62.3 +/- 3.7 vs 56.1 +/- 2.8); in canoeists these differences were non-significant (7, 21.1 +/- 2.1 vs 16.0 +/- 2.3 vs 8, 48.2 +/- 2.6). Values of energy cost of running--coefficients of energy demand of running c, which indicates how much energy is required to transfer 1 kg of body mass on a distance of 1 m--were lower in adult athletes than in young athletes. These differences were significant (p < 0.05) only in long-distance runners (3.69 +/- 0.15 vs 3.84 +/- 0.14 J.kg-1.m-1). In middle-distance runners (3.67 +/- 0.19 vs 3.76 +/- 0.18), and in canoeists (3.84 +/- 0.14 vs 3.86 +/- 0.18) these differences were non-significant. It is concluded that the differences in energy cost of running between trained adult and young female athletes are probably associated with differences in adaptation to the running, and with the technique of movement. Differences in running speed (sports performance) between adult and young athletes are associated with differences in VO2 max.kg-1 and c.

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@article{Bunc1994EnergyCO, title={Energy cost of running in young and adult female athletes.}, author={V{\'a}clav Bunc and Jiř{\'i} Heller}, journal={Ergonomics}, year={1994}, volume={37 1}, pages={167-74} }