Energy and linear and angular momenta in simple electromagnetic systems

@inproceedings{Mansuripur2015EnergyAL,
  title={Energy and linear and angular momenta in simple electromagnetic systems},
  author={Masud Mansuripur},
  booktitle={SPIE NanoScience + Engineering},
  year={2015}
}
  • M. Mansuripur
  • Published in
    SPIE NanoScience…
    25 August 2015
  • Physics
We present examples of simple electromagnetic systems in which energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum exhibit interesting behavior. The systems are sufficiently simple to allow exact solutions of Maxwell’s equations in conjunction with the electrodynamic laws of force, torque, energy, and momentum. In all the cases examined, conservation of energy and momentum is confirmed. 

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