Energy adaptations in human pregnancy: limits and long-term consequences.

@article{Prentice2000EnergyAI,
  title={Energy adaptations in human pregnancy: limits and long-term consequences.},
  author={Andrew M Prentice and Gail R. Goldberg},
  journal={The American journal of clinical nutrition},
  year={2000},
  volume={71 5 Suppl},
  pages={1226S-32S}
}
The very slow rate of human fetal growth generates a lower incremental energy stress than in any other mammalian species. This creates a situation in which adaptive changes in metabolic rate and in the amount of additional maternal fat stored during gestation can make a profound difference to the overall energy needs of pregnancy. Comparisons of women in affluent and poor countries have recorded mean population energy needs ranging from as high as 520 MJ to as low as -30 MJ per pregnancy. These… CONTINUE READING