Energy, water, and food use by springbok antelope (Antidorcas marsupialis) in the Kalahari Desert

@article{Nagy1994EnergyWA,
  title={Energy, water, and food use by springbok antelope (Antidorcas marsupialis) in the Kalahari Desert},
  author={Kenneth A. Nagy and Michael H. Knight},
  journal={Journal of Mammalogy},
  year={1994},
  volume={75},
  pages={860-872}
}
Field-metabolic rates and water-influx rates (both measured via doubly-labeled water) and diet composition (rumen contents, plant sample analyses) were measured in free-ranging male springbok antelope ( Antidorcas marsupialis ) during the three seasons of the Kalahari. Results from springbok that did not drink water during the hot, dry season indicate that they can achieve water balance without drinking if they can obtain plant food containing at least 67% water. Springbok may accomplish this… Expand
Seasonal variation in energy expenditure, water flux and food consumption of Arabian oryx Oryx leucoryx.
We report on the energy expenditure and water flux, measured in the laboratory and in the field, of the Arabian oryx Oryx leucoryx, the largest desert ruminant for which measurements of the fieldExpand
Dietary Plasticity of Generalist and Specialist Ungulates in the Namibian Desert: A Stable Isotopes Approach
TLDR
The results illustrate two dietary strategies in gemsbok and springbok which enable them to survive and coexist in the hostile Kunene arid ecosystem. Expand
WATER INFLUX AND FOOD CONSUMPTION OF FREE-LIVING ORYXES (ORYX LEUCORYX) IN THE ARABIAN DESERT IN SUMMER
TLDR
The Arabian oryx had the lowest mass-specific water-influx rate, only 32% that of the camel, emphasizing the degree of evolutionary specialization in oryx. Expand
Potential Foraging Decisions by a Desert Ungulate to Balance Water and Nutrient Intake in a Water-Stressed Environment
TLDR
How seasonal forage quality and foraging decisions by desert ungulates allow them to cope with their xeric and uncertain environment is elucidated, and it is suggested that, with the forage conditions observed in the study area during this study period, providing supplemental water during water-stressed periods may not be necessary. Expand
Comparative water metabolism of Barrow Island macropodid marsupials: hormonal versus behavioural-dependent mechanisms of body water conservation.
TLDR
Seasonal variations in rates of water turnover were measured in four species of macropodid marsupials on Barrow Island off the arid Pilbara coast of Western Australia, highlighting the importance of environmental features, such as caves and underground warrens, which are critical for the long-term survival of endangered species. Expand
Seasonal nutrient fluctuation in selected plant species in the Kalahari
TLDR
Faecal crude protein and phosphorus percentages higher than that of the selected plant species investigated imply that springbok have the ability to select the most nutrient-rich plant species and plant parts available. Expand
Energy and water use by invasive goats (Capra hircus) in an Australian rangeland, and a caution against using broad-scale allometry to predict species-specific requirements.
TLDR
It is suggested that general allometric analyses predict the range of adaptive possibilities for mammals, but that specific adaptations, as present in goats, result in ecologically significant departures from the average allometric curve. Expand
A Comparison of the Nitrogen Requirements of the Eastern Pygmy Possum, Cercartetus nanus, on a Pollen and on a Mealworm Diet
TLDR
Pollen is an excellent source of nitrogen for C. nanus, and it should be considered as a potential nitrogen source for other flower‐feeding animals. Expand
Circadian variation in resource quality: leaf water content and its relevance to eastern grey kangaroo Macropus giganteus and common wombat Vombatus ursinus
TLDR
It is calculated that the measured grasses could satisfy the water requirements of wombats but not always those of kangaroos, who would need to drink when forage water content was less than about 70%. Expand
Springbok behaviour as affected by environmental conditions in the Kalahari
TLDR
The study showed that springbok behaviour was significantly affected by environmental conditions, implying that changes in climatic conditions, such as those predicted by climate change, or changes in vegetation structure due to degradation, can negatively affect springboks behaviour. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 27 REFERENCES
Hygroscopic Food: a Source of Water for Desert Antelopes?
TLDR
I collected plants which were eaten by antelopes during a drought, determined the rate at which the dry leaves gain water at temperatures and humidities measured during the drought, and calculated the amount of water available to the antelope if they feed at night. Expand
Energy Utilization and Temperature Regulation by Jackrabbits (Lepus californicus) in the Mojave Desert
TLDR
Energy expenditure for black-tailed jackrabbits in the Mojave Desert is highest in winter when ambient temperatures were consistently below the zone of thermoneutrality, and during late spring, summer, and early fall energy expenditure is high despite appreciable seasonal and diurnal temperature shifts. Expand
Productivity of springbokantidorcas marsupialisand Merino sheepovis ariesduring a karoo Drought
TLDR
An increase in the role of the springbok in Karoo farming concurrent with Merino stock reductions is recommend to help improve productivity in this farming enterprise in the Karoo. Expand
Adaptations in three species of large mammals (Antidorcas marsupialis, Hystrix africaeaustralis, Hyaena brunnea) to arid environments
Adaptations in the springbok Antidorcas marsupialis, porcupine Hystrix africaeaustralis and brown hyaena Hyaena brunnea to arid environments are discussed. Springbok evolved in the arid west ofExpand
Primary productivity and herbage utilization by herbivores in Kaputei Plains, Kenya
TLDR
Primary production studies were done on the Kaputei rangeland, in Kenya between February and November 1973, and trampling by all kinds of animals in the area played an important role in herbage utilization, as did herbivorous invertebrates and human factors. Expand
Preliminary results of in vitro digestion of some plants utilized by Kalahari ungulates
Five species of ungulates are compared with respect to digestibility and energy production of some plants found in their diet. Blue wildebeest prefer Stipagrostis obtusa which is well digested andExpand
The importance of borehole water and lick sites to Kalahari ungulates
TLDR
Blue wildebeest were found to be the most water-dependent species, while springbok, gemsboks, red hartebeest and steenbok showed greater use of mineral lick sites at waterholes than of the water itself. Expand
TEMPORAL ACTIVITY PATTERNS OF SPRINGBOK ANTIDORCAS MARSUPIALIS AND MERINO SHEEP OVIS ARIES DURING A KAROO DROUGHT
TLDR
The daily activity patterns of springbok and Merino sheep were studied under open-range conditions in the Karoo for 80 days spanning one whole year, during a period of drought, to determine whether these patterns were affected by drought or by their greater dietary selectivity. Expand
CO2 production in animals: analysis of potential errors in the doubly labeled water method.
  • K. Nagy
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • The American journal of physiology
  • 1980
production are accurate to within &80/c in nine species of mamsumptions associated with this method that, if invalid, mals and reptiles, a bird, and an insect. However, in field could cause errors inExpand
Observations on the Behaviour and Feeding Habits of the Springbok, Antidorcas Marsupialis
AbstractThe stance and attitudes of the springbok are found to be similar to those of other gazelles. Gaits used are a rack-like walk (passgang), a trot and a gallop; display trot, the stott and theExpand
...
1
2
3
...