Energetics and the evolution of human brain size

@article{Navarrete2011EnergeticsAT,
  title={Energetics and the evolution of human brain size},
  author={Ana Navarrete and Carel P. van Schaik and Karin Isler},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2011},
  volume={480},
  pages={91-93}
}
The human brain stands out among mammals by being unusually large. [...] Key Method Here we test it in a sample of 100 mammalian species, including 23 primates, by analysing brain size and organ mass data. We found that, controlling for fat-free body mass, brain size is not negatively correlated with the mass of the digestive tract or any other expensive organ, thus refuting the expensive-tissue hypothesis. Nonetheless, consistent with the existence of energy trade-offs with brain size, we find that the size of…Expand
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