Energetics and genetics across the prokaryote-eukaryote divide

@article{Lane2011EnergeticsAG,
  title={Energetics and genetics across the prokaryote-eukaryote divide},
  author={Nick Lane},
  journal={Biology Direct},
  year={2011},
  volume={6},
  pages={35 - 35}
}
  • N. Lane
  • Published 2011
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Biology Direct
BackgroundAll complex life on Earth is eukaryotic. All eukaryotic cells share a common ancestor that arose just once in four billion years of evolution. Prokaryotes show no tendency to evolve greater morphological complexity, despite their metabolic virtuosity. Here I argue that the eukaryotic cell originated in a unique prokaryotic endosymbiosis, a singular event that transformed the selection pressures acting on both host and endosymbiont.ResultsThe reductive evolution and specialisation of… Expand
Bioenergetic constraints on the evolution of complex life.
  • N. Lane
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in biology
  • 2014
TLDR
It is argued that prokaryotes are constrained by their membrane bioenergetics, for fundamental reasons relating to the origin of life, including the nucleus, sex, two sexes, speciation, and aging. Expand
How energy flow shapes cell evolution
  • N. Lane
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Current Biology
  • 2020
TLDR
The discovery of the Asgard archaea, which harbor close phylogenetic ties to the eukaryotes, supports the idea that a critical endosymbiosis between an archaeal host and a bacterial endOSymbiont transformed the selective constraints present at the origin of eUKaryotes. Expand
Revisiting the hypothesis of an energetic barrier to genome complexity between eukaryotes and prokaryotes
TLDR
The findings indicate that the prokaryote–eukaryote divide is hard to explain from the energetic perspective, and may not entirely discount the traditional hypothesis; in contrast, they indicate the need for more careful examination. Expand
Origin of eukaryotes from within archaea, archaeal eukaryome and bursts of gene gain: eukaryogenesis just made easier?
  • E. Koonin
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2015
TLDR
Comparative genomic analysis clearly shows that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) possessed most of the signature complex features of modern eUKaryotic cells, in particular the mitochondria, the endomembrane system including the nucleus, an advanced cytoskeleton and the ubiquitin network. Expand
How Likely Are We? Evolution of Organismal Complexity
All complex multicellular organisms are eukaryotes. How did the evolution of the highly complex architecture of the eukaryotic cell arise? I discuss the differences between bacteria and archaeaExpand
Serial endosymbiosis or singular event at the origin of eukaryotes?
  • N. Lane
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of theoretical biology
  • 2017
TLDR
Lynn Margulis (then Sagan) marshalled an impressive array of evidence for endosymbiosis, from cell biology to atmospheric chemistry and Earth history, but developed her ideas in the context of atmospheric oxygen and aerobic respiration, neither of which are consistent with more recent geological and phylogenetic findings. Expand
Evolution of Genomic Base Composition: From Single Cell Microbes to Multicellular Animals
TLDR
This mini-review summarizes broadly evolutionary dynamics of base composition in the different domains of life from the perspective of prokaryotes, finding that similar phenomena observed for some organisms in each respective domain may be caused by very different mechanisms. Expand
Eukaryotic origins: How and when was the mitochondrion acquired?
TLDR
It is shown here that the associations between specific cell biological models of eukaryogenesis and evolutionary genomic data are not as strong as many suppose. Expand
Conflict and cooperation in eukaryogenesis: implications for the timing of endosymbiosis and the evolution of sex
TLDR
Perhaps the greatest opportunity for conflict arose with the emergence of eukaryotic sex, involving whole-cell fusion, and a simple model demonstrates that competition on the lower level severely hinders the evolution of sex. Expand
Eukaryote specific folds: Part of the whole
TLDR
Structural superfamilies and folds originating from an eukaryotic stem seem to represent accessory parts that have contributed in the expansion of several prokaryotic processes to a new level of complexity. Expand
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