Energetic Particles at Venus: Galileo Results

@article{Williams1991EnergeticPA,
  title={Energetic Particles at Venus: Galileo Results},
  author={D. J. Williams and Richard W. Mcentire and Stamatios M. Krimigis and E. C. Roelof and Stephen E. Jaskulek and B. E. Tossman and Berend Wilken and Wolfgang ST�DEMANN and Thomas P. Armstrong and Theodore A. Fritz and Louis J. Lanzerotti and Juan G. Roederer},
  journal={Science},
  year={1991},
  volume={253},
  pages={1525 - 1528}
}
At Venus the Energetic Particles Detector (EPD) on the Galileo spacecraft measured the differential energy spectra and angular distributions of ions >22 kiloelectron volts (keV) and electrons > 15 keV in energy. The only time particles were observed by EPD was in a series of episodic events [0546 to 0638 universal time (UT)] near closest approach (0559:03 UT). Angular distributions were highly anisotropic, ordered by the magnetic field, and showed ions arriving from the hemisphere containing… Expand
Plasma Observations at Venus with Galileo
TLDR
Solar wind densities and bulk speeds were determined from the electron velocity distributions, and a search for pickup ions from the hot hydrogen and oxygen planetary coronas yielded an upper limit in the range of 10-3 ion per cubic centimeter, which is consistent with densities expected from current models of neutral gas densities. Expand
Particle acceleration at the Sun and in the heliosphere
Energetic particles are accelerated in rich profusion at sites throughout the heliosphere. They come from solar flares in the low corona, from shock waves driven outward by coronal mass ejectionsExpand
Fine structure of Langmuir waves observed upstream of the bow shock at Venus
Highly structured Langmuir waves, also known as electron plasma oscillations, have been observed in the foreshock of Venus using the plasma wave experiment on the Galileo spacecraft during theExpand
Magnetic Field Studies of the Solar Wind Interaction with Venus from the Galileo Flyby
During the 10 February 1990 flyby of Venus, the Galileo spacecraft skimmed the downstream flank of the planetary bow shock. This provided an opportunity to examine both the global and the localExpand
Lightning and Plasma Wave Observations from the Galileo Flyby of Venus
TLDR
During the Galileo flyby of Venus the plasma wave instrument was used to search for impulsive radio signals from lightning and to investigate locally generated plasma waves, which have considerable fine structure because of the formation of soliton-like wave packets. Expand
Statistical imaging of the Venus foreshock using VLF wave emissions
Strong VLF wave emissions have been shown to be an intrinsic property of the Venus foreshock and foreshocks in general. In this work, we use these measured wave emissions to construct statisticalExpand
Ablation of Venusian oxygen ions by unshocked solar wind
Abstract As an Earth-like planet Venus probably had a primordial dipole field for several million years after formation of the planet. Since this dipole field eventually vanished the ionosphere ofExpand
The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) on the New Horizons Mission
The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) comprises the hardware and accompanying science investigation on the New Horizons spacecraft to measure pick-up ions fromExpand
The solar wind interaction with Venus: A comparison of Galileo and Pioneer Venus observations
Abstract The rudimentary measurements of the instruments on Pioneer Venus over a 14 year span have provided a strong framework for the interpretation of the observations with a more sophisticatedExpand
Serendipitous science from flybys of secondary targets: Galileo at Venus, Earth, and asteroids; Ulysses at Jupiter
During this quadrennium, while the Voyager and Pioneer spacecraft moved through the outer heliosphere, ever further from the sun, the Ulysses and Galileo spacecraft were traversing the innerExpand
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-8 OF 8 REFERENCES
Plasma Observations at Venus with Galileo
TLDR
Solar wind densities and bulk speeds were determined from the electron velocity distributions, and a search for pickup ions from the hot hydrogen and oxygen planetary coronas yielded an upper limit in the range of 10-3 ion per cubic centimeter, which is consistent with densities expected from current models of neutral gas densities. Expand
Magnetic Field Studies of the Solar Wind Interaction with Venus from the Galileo Flyby
During the 10 February 1990 flyby of Venus, the Galileo spacecraft skimmed the downstream flank of the planetary bow shock. This provided an opportunity to examine both the global and the localExpand
Coupled hydromagnetic wave excitation and ion acceleration upstream of the earth's bow shock
We extend the Lee (1982) self-consistent theory of upstream wave excitation and particle energization to address observations by Voyager 2 of sunward propagating MHD waves and diffuse suprathermalExpand
Suprathermal ions observed upstream of the Venus bow shock
Suprathermal ions with arrival directions quite distinct from those of the solar wind have been detected upstream of the Venus bow shock. We examine the possibility that these events could be causedExpand
The Galileo Venus Encounter
TLDR
Together with ground-based observations conducted during the Venus encounter, these observations have yielded more accurate information about the planet's plasma environment, cloud patterns, and the possible existence of lightning. Expand
Computer modeling of test particle acceleration at oblique shocks
We review the basic techniques and results of numerical codes used to model the acceleration of charged particles at oblique, fast-mode, collisionless shocks. The emphasis is upon models in whichExpand
V
  • M. Vasyluinas, ibid., p.
Pedersen, ibid
  • 1986