Endurance running and the evolution of Homo

@article{Bramble2004EnduranceRA,
  title={Endurance running and the evolution of Homo},
  author={Dennis M. Bramble and Daniel E. Lieberman},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={432},
  pages={345-352}
}
Striding bipedalism is a key derived behaviour of hominids that possibly originated soon after the divergence of the chimpanzee and human lineages. Although bipedal gaits include walking and running, running is generally considered to have played no major role in human evolution because humans, like apes, are poor sprinters compared to most quadrupeds. Here we assess how well humans perform at sustained long-distance running, and review the physiological and anatomical bases of endurance… Expand

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