Endovascular treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

@article{Donnet2008EndovascularTO,
  title={Endovascular treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension},
  author={Anne Donnet and Philippe Metellus and Olivier L{\'e}vrier and Choukri Mekkaoui and S Fuentes and Henri Dufour and John Conrath and François Grisoli},
  journal={Neurology},
  year={2008},
  volume={70},
  pages={641 - 647}
}
Objective: To explore the relation between venous disease and idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Background: Optic nerve sheath fenestration and ventricular shunting are the classic methods when medical treatment has failed. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is caused by venous sinus obstruction in an unknown percentage of cases. Recently, endoluminal venous sinus stenting was proposed as an alternative treatment. Methods: Ten consecutive patients with refractory idiopathic intracranial… 

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