Endothermy and activity in vertebrates.

@article{Bennett1979EndothermyAA,
  title={Endothermy and activity in vertebrates.},
  author={Albert F. Bennett and John A. Ruben},
  journal={Science},
  year={1979},
  volume={206 4419},
  pages={
          649-54
        }
}
Resting and maximal levels of oxygen consumption of endothermic vertebrates exceed those of ectotherms by an average of five- to tenfold. Endotherms have a much broader range of activity that can be sustained by this augmented aerobic metabolism. Ectotherms are more reliant upon, and limited by, anaerobic metabolism during activity. A principal factor in the evolution of endothermy was the increase in aerobic capacities to support sustained activity. 

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