Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in red blood cells: Key to a new erythrocrine function?☆

@inproceedings{CorteseKrott2014EndothelialNO,
  title={Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in red blood cells: Key to a new erythrocrine function?☆},
  author={Miriam M Cortese-Krott and Malte Kelm},
  booktitle={Redox biology},
  year={2014}
}
Red blood cells (RBC) have been considered almost exclusively as a transporter of metabolic gases and nutrients for the tissues. It is an accepted dogma that RBCs take up and inactivate endothelium-derived NO via rapid reaction with oxyhemoglobin to form methemoglobin and nitrate, thereby limiting NO available for vasodilatation. Yet it has also been shown that RBCs not only act as "NO sinks", but exert an erythrocrine function - i.e an endocrine function of RBC - by synthesizing, transporting… CONTINUE READING

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MethemoglobinGene product expressed in tissueErythrocytes
It is an accepted dogma that RBCs take up and inactivate endothelium - derived NO via rapid reaction with oxyhemoglobin to form methemoglobin and nitrate , thereby limiting NO available for vasodilatation .
Recent work from our and others laboratory demonstrated that human RBCs carry an active type 3 , endothelial NO synthase ( eNOS ) , constitutively producing NO under normoxic conditions , the activity of which is compromised in patients with coronary artery disease .
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