Endothelial dysfunction in diabetes

@article{DeVriese2000EndothelialDI,
  title={Endothelial dysfunction in diabetes},
  author={An S. De Vriese and Tony J. Verbeuren and Johan van de Voorde and Norbert H. Lameire and Paul Michel Vanhoutte},
  journal={British Journal of Pharmacology},
  year={2000},
  volume={130}
}
Endothelial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular disease. The endothelium controls the tone of the underlying vascular smooth muscle through the production of vasodilator mediators. The endothelium‐derived relaxing factors (EDRF) comprise nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin, and a still elusive endothelium‐derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). Impaired endothelium‐dependent vasodilation has been demonstrated in various vascular beds of different animal models of… Expand
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