Endosymbiotic gene transfer: organelle genomes forge eukaryotic chromosomes

@article{Timmis2004EndosymbioticGT,
  title={Endosymbiotic gene transfer: organelle genomes forge eukaryotic chromosomes},
  author={Jeremy N. Timmis and Michael Ayliffe and Chun-Yuan Huang and William F. Martin},
  journal={Nature Reviews Genetics},
  year={2004},
  volume={5},
  pages={123-135}
}
Genome sequences reveal that a deluge of DNA from organelles has constantly been bombarding the nucleus since the origin of organelles. Recent experiments have shown that DNA is transferred from organelles to the nucleus at frequencies that were previously unimaginable. Endosymbiotic gene transfer is a ubiquitous, continuing and natural process that pervades nuclear DNA dynamics. This relentless influx of organelle DNA has abolished organelle autonomy and increased nuclear complexity. 
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