Endoskeletal structure in Cheirolepis (Osteichthyes, Actinopterygii), An early ray‐finned fish

@article{Giles2015EndoskeletalSI,
  title={Endoskeletal structure in Cheirolepis (Osteichthyes, Actinopterygii), An early ray‐finned fish},
  author={Sam Giles and Michael I. Coates and Russell J. Garwood and Martin D. Brazeau and Robert C. Atwood and Zerina Johanson and Matt Friedman},
  journal={Palaeontology},
  year={2015},
  volume={58},
  pages={849 - 870}
}
As the sister lineage of all other actinopterygians, the Middle to Late Devonian (Eifelian–Frasnian) Cheirolepis occupies a pivotal position in vertebrate phylogeny. Although the dermal skeleton of this taxon has been exhaustively described, very little of its endoskeleton is known, leaving questions of neurocranial and fin evolution in early ray‐finned fishes unresolved. The model for early actinopterygian anatomy has instead been based largely on the Late Devonian (Frasnian) Mimipiscis… 

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