Endogenous sex hormone levels in postmenopausal women undergoing carotid artery endarterectomy.

@article{Debing2007EndogenousSH,
  title={Endogenous sex hormone levels in postmenopausal women undergoing carotid artery endarterectomy.},
  author={Erik Debing and Els Peeters and William Duquet and Kris Gustave Poppe and Brigitte Velkeniers and Pierre Van den Brande},
  journal={European journal of endocrinology},
  year={2007},
  volume={156 6},
  pages={
          687-93
        }
}
OBJECTIVE To study the endogenous sex hormone levels in natural postmenopausal women and their association with the presence of internal carotid artery (ICA) atherosclerosis. DESIGN Case-control study METHODS We compared 56 patients with severe ICA atherosclerosis referred for carotid artery endarterectomy (CEA) with 56 age-matched control subjects free of severe atherosclerotic disease. The presence of atherosclerosis was determined by high-resolution B-mode ultrasound. Metabolic… 

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