Endocrine disruptors in bottled mineral water: total estrogenic burden and migration from plastic bottles

@article{Wagner2009EndocrineDI,
  title={Endocrine disruptors in bottled mineral water: total estrogenic burden and migration from plastic bottles},
  author={Martin Wagner and J{\"o}rg Oehlmann},
  journal={Environmental Science and Pollution Research},
  year={2009},
  volume={16},
  pages={278-286}
}
  • M. Wagner, J. Oehlmann
  • Published 10 March 2009
  • Environmental Science, Medicine
  • Environmental Science and Pollution Research
Background, aim, and scopeFood consumption is an important route of human exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals. So far, this has been demonstrated by exposure modeling or analytical identification of single substances in foodstuff (e.g., phthalates) and human body fluids (e.g., urine and blood). Since the research in this field is focused on few chemicals (and thus missing mixture effects), the overall contamination of edibles with xenohormones is largely unknown. The aim of this study… Expand
Endocrine disruptors in bottled mineral water: Estrogenic activity in the E-Screen
  • M. Wagner, J. Oehlmann
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • 2011
TLDR
Different sample preparation methods to extract estrogen-like compounds from bottled water are compared and the contamination of bottled water with endocrine disruptors is indicated to be a transnational phenomenon. Expand
Endocrine disruptor activity in bottled mineral and flavoured water.
A panel of reporter gene assays (RGAs) coupled with a single solid phase extraction (SPE) step was developed and used to screen bottled mineral water for the presence of four classes of endocrineExpand
Screening of endocrine-disrupting phenols, herbicides, steroid estrogens, and estrogenicity in drinking water from the waterworks of 35 Italian cities and from PET-bottled mineral water
TLDR
Investigation of contamination by endocrine-disrupting chemicals in drinking water from 35 major Italian cities and five popular Italian brands of bottled mineral water found no steroid estrogens, while herbicides and their degradation products, when present, were found from slightly above the quantification limits up to 49.91 ng/L. Expand
Endocrine disruptors in bottled mineral water: Estrogenic activity in the E-Screen
  • J. Heinze
  • Medicine, Chemistry
  • The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • 2011
TLDR
In concluding that PET bottles are a source of strogenic activity, the authors focused only on the data pairs of roducts 5 through 10, ignoring products 1 through 4, and there is no evidence that the observed activity is estroenic. Expand
Estrogenic activity, selected plasticizers and potential health risks associated with bottled water in South Africa.
TLDR
Irrespective of temperature, bottled water from SA contained chemicals with acceptable health risks, and EEqs and BPA concentrations were higher in bottled water stored at 40 °C compared to 20 °C, samples posed an acceptable risk for a lifetime of exposure. Expand
Assessment of estrogenic compounds in paperboard for dry food packaging with the ERE-CALUX bioassay.
TLDR
Investigation of estrogenic activities of paperboard food packaging and its characteristics, including recycling rate and printing ink found a relationship between estrogenic activity and the recycling rate of the paperboard, but no significant difference with printing ink was observed for these paperboard samples. Expand
Effect of Heavy Metal Ions on Steroid Estrogen Removal and Transport in SAT Using DLLME as a Detection Method of Steroid Estrogen
Environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals have become a global environmental problem, and the distribution, transport, and fate of estrogens in soil and water environments closely relate to humanExpand
Exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds via the food chain: Is packaging a relevant source?
  • J. Muncke
  • Medicine, Chemistry
  • The Science of the total environment
  • 2009
TLDR
The regulations and use of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in food packaging are reviewed and their presence within the context of new toxicology paradigms are discussed, with a focus on nonylphenol. Expand
Dietary Exposure of Nigerians to Mutagens and Estrogen-Like Chemicals
TLDR
Food and drinking water are poorly delineated sources of human exposure to chemical food mutagens and endocrine-disrupting chemicals and, although the current situation in Nigeria does not appear to be substantially worse than, e.g., in Europe, regular monitoring is warranted in the future. Expand
Screening of hormone-like activities in bottled waters available in Southern Spain using receptor-specific bioassays.
TLDR
Hormone-like activities observed in waters from both plastic and glass bottles suggest that plastic packaging is not the sole source of contamination and that the source of the water and bottling process may play a role, among other factors. Expand
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