• Biology, Medicine
  • Published in
    Environmental toxicology and…
    2012
  • DOI:10.1002/etc.1824

Endocrine disruption due to estrogens derived from humans predicted to be low in the majority of U.S. surface waters.

@article{Anderson2012EndocrineDD,
  title={Endocrine disruption due to estrogens derived from humans predicted to be low in the majority of U.S. surface waters.},
  author={Paul D. Anderson and Andrew C. Johnson and Danielle Pfeiffer and Daniel J Caldwell and Robert Hannah and Frank J Mastrocco and John P. Sumpter and Richard J. Williams},
  journal={Environmental toxicology and chemistry},
  year={2012},
  volume={31 6},
  pages={
          1407-15
        }
}
In an effort to assess the combined risk estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2), and estriol (E3) pose to aquatic wildlife across United States watersheds, two sets of predicted-no-effect concentrations (PNECs) for significant reproductive effects in fish were compared to predicted environmental concentrations (PECs). One set of PNECs was developed for evaluation of effects following long-term exposures. A second set was derived for short-term exposures. Both sets of… CONTINUE READING

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