Endocrine Mediators of Masculinization in Female Mammals

@article{Drea2009EndocrineMO,
  title={Endocrine Mediators of Masculinization in Female Mammals},
  author={Christine M. Drea},
  journal={Current Directions in Psychological Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={18},
  pages={221 - 226}
}
  • C. Drea
  • Published 1 August 2009
  • Biology
  • Current Directions in Psychological Science
Most mammal species show traditional patterns of sexual dimorphism (e.g., greater male size and aggression), the proximal mechanism of which involves the male's greater pre- and postnatal exposure to circulating androgens. But in several species, females diverge from the traditional pattern, converging on the male form or even reversing sexual dimorphisms. Such “masculinized” females might show elongation of the clitoris, enhanced body size, and aggressively mediated social dominance over males… 

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