Endocranial Volume of Mid-Late Eocene Archaeocetes (Order: Cetacea) Revealed by Computed Tomography: Implications for Cetacean Brain Evolution

@article{Marino2004EndocranialVO,
  title={Endocranial Volume of Mid-Late Eocene Archaeocetes (Order: Cetacea) Revealed by Computed Tomography: Implications for Cetacean Brain Evolution},
  author={Lori Marino and Mark D. Uhen and Bruno Frohlich and John Matthew Aldag and Caroline E. Blane and David J. Bohaska and Frank C. Whitmore},
  journal={Journal of Mammalian Evolution},
  year={2004},
  volume={7},
  pages={81-94}
}
The large brain of modern cetaceans has engendered much hypothesizing about both the intelligence of cetaceans (dolphins, whales, and porpoises) and the factors related to the evolution of such large brains. Despite much interest in cetacean brain evolution, until recently there have been few estimates of brain mass and/or brain–body weight ratios in fossil cetaceans. In the present study, computed tomography (CT) was used to visualize and estimate endocranial volume, as well as to calculate… 

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