End-tidal carbon dioxide tension reflects arterial carbon dioxide tension in the heat-stressed human with and without simulated hemorrhage.

@article{Brothers2011EndtidalCD,
  title={End-tidal carbon dioxide tension reflects arterial carbon dioxide tension in the heat-stressed human with and without simulated hemorrhage.},
  author={R Matthew Brothers and Matthew S. Ganio and Kimberly A. Hubing and Jeffrey L Hastings and Craig G Crandall},
  journal={American journal of physiology. Regulatory, integrative and comparative physiology},
  year={2011},
  volume={300 4},
  pages={R978-83}
}
End-tidal carbon dioxide tension (Pet(CO(2))) is reduced during an orthostatic challenge, during heat stress, and during a combination of these two conditions. The importance of these changes is dependent on Pet(CO(2)) being an accurate surrogate for arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa(CO(2))), the latter being the physiologically relevant variable. This study tested the hypothesis that Pet(CO(2)) provides an accurate assessment of Pa(CO(2)) during the aforementioned conditions. Comparisons… CONTINUE READING

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