End of the New Zealand asthma mortality epidemic

@article{Pearce1995EndOT,
  title={End of the New Zealand asthma mortality epidemic},
  author={Neil Pearce and Richard Beasley and Julian Crane and Carl D. Burgess and Rodney Jackson},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={1995},
  volume={345},
  pages={41-44}
}
In 1989, a case-control study reported that inhaled fenoterol was associated with the epidemic of asthma deaths that had affected New Zealand since 1976. The New Zealand Department of Health issued warnings about the safety of fenoterol and restricted its availability. The associated time trends are consistent with the hypothesis that fenoterol was the main factor in the New Zealand asthma mortality epidemic. The epidemic commenced when fenoterol was introduced in 1976, and the New Zealand… 
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